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University Spotlight: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Chapel Hill may be the oldest public university in America (it was chartered in 1789), but that doesn’t stop it from keeping up with the times. It’s well known that UNC is a strong, competitive research institution that provides its students with a well-rounded liberal arts education.

So, you can imagine how excited we were to accept a Tar Heel as a summer 2017 fellow!

Keep reading to find out more about his summer fellowship.

Saif Mehyar

Saif spent his summer in Chicago as an intern for Booksy, a free appointment scheduling application for users looking to find beauty and health services. At Booksy, Saif was primarily responsible for managing the company’s brand ambassador program and using analytics platforms like Google Analytics to optimize sales and pricing strategies.

Saif is a rising senior at UNC majoring in Business and minoring in Psychology.

Saif and some of his fellow Chicago cohort at 1871 Chicago, a co-working space hosting major startup incubators and accelerators.

Saif and some of his fellow Chicago cohort at 1871 Chicago, a co-working space hosting major startup incubators and accelerators.

Why did you decide to participate in Sage Corps?

I joined the entrepreneurship club at UNC, and after listening to entrepreneurs and professionals who have done great things by starting their own companies (especially ones built around solving social issues), I decided that I wanted to know what it would be like to work at a young, dynamic startup that was helping solve a significant problem. I also knew that previous Sage Corps fellows had a great time interning in their respective cities and attested to the quality of their internship experiences.

How has this experience helped you get closer to achieving your post-graduation/ career goals?

Sage Corps promised me an intensive internship mixed with weekly events that would help hone my professional skills. I am happy to say that I got both of those things and I definitely have had a number of projects that I can talk about during interviews for graduate school or first-year positions. I can also say that I had a ton of responsibility working at a startup, an environment much different than that of a traditional internship. That is undoubtedly something I can capitalize on in my career going forward.

Name one of the biggest challenges you’ve successfully overcome this summer.

I think the biggest challenge for me this summer was learning to take risks (as cheeeesy as that sounds). I consider myself to be a very ‘safe’ person (no pun intended) and I’m usually drawn to tasks that are familiar to me or that I’ve done before. This summer, I decided that I wanted to challenge myself to step out of my comfort zone and I think I’ve accomplished that not only in the tasks I’ve been doing at work but also by reaching out to professionals in the Chicago area and developing new connections.

What is the most valuable lesson/ most valuable skill you’ve learned or strengthened during your internship?

The most valuable lesson I’ve learned is the importance of listening actively and gleaning knowledge from people who have more experience than you.

Saif is considering several paths post-graduation, including pursuing a Master’s degree, moving back to the Middle East, or pursuing marketing or data science opportunities in the States. 

We’re so proud of Saif and all of the amazing work he accomplished this summer. We’re excited to see what the future holds for this Sage Corps Alumnus!

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Networking Advice from a Fellow Introvert

This post was written by Sarah Rudd, Sage Corps' summer marketing intern.

“It’s not what you know. It’s who you know.”

Being a college student, this phrase has become increasingly familiar as I’ve entered my upperclassman years. But what does it mean, and why is it important?

As Sage Corps’ marketing intern these past few months, I’ve had the opportunity to attend multiple professional events alongside the Chicago cohort. Most recently, I attended Technori’s Legends event, and the event kicked off with an entire hour dedicated to networking.

Growing up, I always considered myself an introvert, so the prospect of networking has always been daunting to me. The idea of striking up a conversation with a stranger was never something I had considered comfortable, and I never thought that I would be able to network with strangers as well as my more extroverted peers.

Are you nodding your head in solidarity? Trust me, I get it. BUT, what I’ve come to realize this summer is how easy it actually is to make a connection with someone, and in turn continue to grow your professional network.

At the Technori event, I ended up meeting the founder of Current Nightlife App, other students from the University of Illinois whom I had never met on campus before, and Scott Kitun (Technori’s CEO, no big deal) even jumped in to photobomb my picture.

How did I do this, you ask? I started to realize that everyone is in the same boat. Sure, some people are definitely more comfortable initiating conversation than others. But at the same time, when it comes to networking, everyone has the same goals, which helps level the playing field to create a more comfortable and open environment for casual conversation. Everyone is looking to talk to someone, which creates a mutual desire to connect. Never in a million years would I have expected myself to feel comfortable at an event where the sole purpose was to put yourself out there and meet someone new, but by simply letting my guard down I was able to successfully establish new relationships (and have a great time doing so!).

Still feeling anxious? Not sure where to start? Keep reading, we’ve got you covered.

Tips

We turned to the experts to pull some of the best networking tips to help you as you prepare for your next networking event. Matt Barnett, CEO of Vimily Pty Ltd, shared some of his most helpful networking tips. Here they are:

  • “Just be you. You’re doing a great thing, you’re interesting, eager to learn, have a different perspective, everyone will find that great. Share your passions.”

  • “Just jump in. Everyone is okay with that – you have nothing to lose, and the more you do it, the easier it gets.”

  • “Play the student card: No successful person got where they are without a little help, and we all like to give back. If someone interests you, and you want to learn – ask them exactly that. Ask if you could grab a coffee with them down the line to learn a little more about their industry etc.”

  • “Make sure you have a reason to catch up – if you’re interested in starting a company, their advice is enough reason. Most of us will meet with you. “

Susan Chappell, Employer Engagement Manager from the Career Services Center at Pennsylvania State University, offered this additional piece of advice:

“Networking events can be scary to the new attendee but don’t let that keep you from going! Preparation and practice are the key to a good experience. Developing a strong 30-second elevator pitch (including who you are, your major, professional interests, and relevant student activities) and a firm handshake can make all the difference. And don’t forget the real reason that you are there: to build your professional network. So send a note of thanks after the event to those people who invited you and/or shared their contact information to let them know just how much you enjoyed the opportunity.

In case you need just a few more words of wisdom, Larry Jackson, Assistant Director of Student Career Advising at Northwestern Career Advancement, offered this final piece of advice:

"Dress professionally, and know your goal for networking. Ask open ended questions in order to stimulate conversation."

Where and How to Find Events

Now that you know how to network, it’s time to find an opportunity to put your skills to the test. Although it is possible to network in less formal situations, networking events can provide a more successful opportunity to establish connections. Matt provided a few additional tips on how to find networking events:

  • Ask your host company what they will be going to, and tag along!

  • If you are working in a startup space or are able to find a startup space or community, get on the event mailing list! From Tank Stream Labs in Sydney, Australia, to WeWork offices around the globe, there are plenty of events to attend

  • Hop on Meetup, Eventbrite, and get searching!

  • Ask each other – start a Facebook group with fellow interns and get everyone to post whatever they find.

What are you waiting for? Now that you know where to find the events and how to go about networking, get out there and meet people! And don’t forget to add them on LinkedIn - maybe even throw in a personal note about how you enjoyed their conversation, and would like to reconnect in the future. Who knows, that newly established connection could be your next customer, business partner, or even future boss!

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University Spotlight: Indiana University

This post was written by Sarah Rudd, Sage Corps' marketing intern.

Across the world from Bloomington, Indiana, we have two fellows repping Cream and Crimson in our summer program this year.

We checked in with one of our Hoosier fellows, Alex, to see what she’s been up to in Hong Kong this summer:

Alexandria Stone

Alex is a rising senior in the Kelley School of Business studying Marketing, co-majoring in Social Media and Digital Applications, and minoring in Psychology. She is also considering another co-major in Sales.

Alex is currently working with Well Being Digital Ltd. (WBD101) as a marketing intern in Hong Kong, China. WBD101 is a startup that uses technology to create accurate and dynamic hearable and wearable devices for applications ranging from the consumer to the healthcare industry.

What are some of your main responsibilities at work?

“Currently I am in charge of creating an Amazon store for one of our consumer products. This includes writing forecast/planning reports that go straight into the hands of the investors, setting up fulfillment operations to reach the U.S. market from Hong Kong, dealing directly with Amazon reps in the U.S., participating in strategic product pricing, creating a promotional plan for the product on social media, building an analytical model to measure the digital promotions, and managing the continuous operations of the storefront.

I also am in charge of the company newsletter and ensuring that it reaches a multilingual audience. In addition to my marketing duties, I help product test some equipment and then interpret the results of the test in Excel for my founders.

I have a lot of responsibilities and it’s pretty hard work, but it pays off. I’m able to sit at a table with our founders and learn directly from them. I will also walk away knowing that my daily work truly contributed to the company in a meaningful way.”

Name one of your biggest wins of the summer.

“A big win in my internship was when I completed a couple market research reports for my founder and he told me I was going to present it to our investors. It meant a lot that he appreciated my work and trusted me enough to include me in discussions with investors.”

Why did you decide to participate in Sage Corps?

“The Kelley Business School has a really intense/competitive environment, which is one of the reasons it is such a fantastic program. Kelley also goes above and beyond to prepare the students for recruitment, through advising and curriculum. So as I entered recruitment season of my junior year for my summer internship, I knew I was ready. I went on a lot of interviews and even received a couple offers, but I just could not match the enthusiasm of my classmates. Everyone seemed so sure of the paths they were following. I mostly just felt anxious/scared because the internship after junior year sets the foundation for a career and nothing felt right. As the school year went on and the months passed, I never had an interview or potential job that inspired me beyond the salary potential. Finally in early March, I was about to give in to an offer when I saw a Sage Corps post on the Kelley Connect board.

Everything about the opportunity excited me. I wanted an internship where the intern’s work is meaningful to the company. I wanted to learn and grow, to experience a new city, to be challenged in new ways, and most importantly I wanted an experience so different from those I encountered in the recruiting process. I knew I made the right choice when my anxiety about starting my career was replaced with excitement.”

At this time, what are your post-graduation plans?

“I’m still discovering exactly what my dream job will be. I’m absolutely stoked that this is the position I am in as I start my senior year. From the way my internship is going, I think I’m going to chase full-time employment outside the U.S. These next 5-8 will be the greatest years of my life in terms of opportunity. I don’t plan on being safe and practical in my approach to business, but I do plan on working hard and jumping on all the opportunities that come my way.”

How has this experience helped you get closer to achieving your post-graduation/ career goals?

“As I mentioned, I still don’t know exactly what I am doing, but I’m getting closer. I feel so much better about the uncertainty of my future because I know everything will work out if I continue to work hard and seize opportunities. It has always been a goal of mine to be successful in business, but now I see a different way of reaching that goal.

This experience also has given me a reality check. I am seeing first hand how much hard work it takes to reach your goals. It’s easy to think that you will be successful as long as you take a risk and show up. Taking the risk is only half the battle. I now know how difficult success is, but I know that it can be done. I’m likely to have some huge failures, but moving past them is what is important. This is insurmountable knowledge because it removes any lingering entitlements I might have had while preparing for post-graduation.”

Alex and members of her cohort in Hong Kong, China.

Alex and members of her cohort in Hong Kong, China.

When we asked Alex if she had a favorite professor back in Bloomington, she confidently gave us Professor Roberto Garcia’s name.

“Professor Garcia made a resounding impact on my college career and life and he probably doesn’t even know it. My sophomore year I took the Global Core (G-Core) classes, as it is required of all students in the Kelley School of Business.  G-Core is comprised of international business classes and it’s one of the things that makes Kelley School of Business so unique. Going into the class I honestly had no interest of taking it seriously, past the point of getting a good grade because I’m not an international business major. Professor Garcia taught the class and I walked away with a totally different world view. Through his lessons he demonstrated the massive amount of opportunities that hide from us when we take an egocentric and xenophobic approach to other cultures. I had never even considered living outside the U.S. in a million years. But thanks to KSB and Professor Garcia, I’m working in Hong Kong and I’m fairly certain I will be seeking full-time employment in Asia after graduation.”

We reached out to Professor Garcia to see if he had any insights about the importance of traveling and interning abroad. Here is what he had to say:

“Every year I work with hundreds of students in the classroom to help them understand how doing business internationally differs from business in their home countries. Many of these topics are surprising and interesting to them. However, once they return from studying abroad in a foreign land they actually “get it” because they experienced these differences first hand. Students frequently tell me how their global perspective on business has changed greatly and for the better after studying abroad. Often, they cannot wait to experience another country in the near future. It is always interesting for me how my students change after studying and living abroad.”

It is clear that Alex does “get it” after having spent nearly eight weeks abroad in Hong Kong. We are impressed with all that she has accomplished in this short time span, and we are excited to watch her continue grow professionally as she enters her senior year!

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How to leave your internship on a high note

It’s hard to believe, but your summer internship will soon be coming to an end. You’ve traveled to a new place, put in hundreds of hours at the office, and learned how to integrate yourself into an unfamiliar team with its own unique dynamic. You’ve worked really hard this summer, and you should be proud of yourself!

But, your work isn’t done yet. Ending your internship on good terms is just as important as your actual performance on the job. It’s important to be thorough and organized as you wrap up your summer to ensure that both you and your employer remember your internship as a positive, productive experience.

We’ve put together five tips to follow before you clean out your desk and turn in your badge.

1. Say thank you. And don’t just say it, write it. And not in an email. A short, simple hand-written thank you card to each of your team members will show your team that you’re grateful for their mentorship and feedback. Make it short and sweet. A simple note with text such as, “Thank you so much for a great summer. I’m grateful to have had the opportunity to work with you and learn from you, and I enjoyed getting to know you. Let’s stay connected!” will reinforce your thoughtfulness and professionalism in a subtle way.

2. Set up an exit interview. Sometime during your last week at the office, ask your supervisor to have a quick chat with you to wrap things up. Talk about your biggest successes and challenges of the summer. Ask for constructive feedback about your working style and advice for your future. Reiterate that you are grateful to have had this opportunity. If it feels appropriate, feel free to ask for a reference or letter of recommendation. However you end the conversation, make sure it’s clear to your supervisor that you’re interested in staying connected and collaborating in the future.

3. Make the transition as smooth as possible for your team. Throughout the summer, you’ve had a lot of responsibilities and worked on several projects. It’s important to transition that work over to an incoming intern or another member of your team; no one likes an intern who leaves behind chaos and disorganization. Make a list of your main duties and projects. In that list, include anything that needs to be done immediately in the coming days and weeks. This way, nothing will slip through the cracks. Plus, this will show your team that you still care about the future of the company even if you’re no longer an employee.

4. Update your LinkedIn profile and resume. While everything is fresh in your mind, think about your main accomplishments of the summer, and include quantitative benchmarks where you can. Did you help grow the company’s social media pages by a certain percentage of followers? Did you launch an app that now has hundreds of users? Think about your biggest wins of the summer, and articulate them in a way that markets your skills and experience. The longer you wait to do this, the harder it will be! So, do your best to not procrastinate.

5. Collect samples for your portfolio. Is there anything you’ve done this summer that if made public, wouldn’t violate any non-disclosure agreements you’ve signed? Check with your supervisor and find out what samples or projects you’d be able to showcase as part of your portfolio. This way, in addition to your resume, you’ll have concrete, tangible examples to show future employers of your abilities. Any real-world work that you’ve done outside of the classroom that you can showcase will go a long way!

Congratulations on making it this far in your internship! Finish out strong by completing these five simple tasks that will take you little or no time. As the saying goes, a little goes a long way. Who knows where these things will take you?

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University Spotlight: University of Southern California

This blog piece was written by Sarah Rudd, Sage Corps' summer marketing intern.

Located in sunny SoCal, the University of Southern California is known for its rigorous academic programs, successful sports teams, and, of course, beautiful weather.

However, the university is also known for some of its notable alumni entrepreneurs, including one of Myspace’s founders, the co-founders of Tinder, and the founder of Lucasfilm.

Speaking of entrepreneurship, we are excited to have nine total USC students learning from some of the best entrepreneurs in Singapore, Berlin, Chicago, Amsterdam, Melbourne, New York, and Santiago this summer!

We checked in with two of our Summer 2017 fellows from USC to see what they’re up to in Singapore, and here’s what they had to say.

Bulat Bayminov

Bulat is interning at billionBricks in Singapore, an NGO startup that uses architectural and design knowledge to work toward solving homelessness. His responsibilities include monitoring social media channels and working toward improving exposure and awareness on the website and social media posts.

Bulat is a rising senior studying economics and business.

How has this experience helped you get closer to achieving your post-graduation/ career goals?

"Understanding how startups work, and the importance of communication between the co-workers."

Why did you decide to participate in Sage Corps?

"Although I like living in the U.S., I thought that while I am young, ambitious and still have energy in the tanks, I need to explore the world and get myself outside my comfort zone to go to some exotic places around the globe, like Singapore!"

What's the most fun/ coolest thing you've done with your cohort so far this summer?

"An event with one of the co-founders of Vision Strategy Storytelling (VSS) at a fancy co-working space near the Financial District. Here, we got to know about the implications of moving to Singapore for work, the highlights of managing an international company, and so on."

When we asked Bulat if he had a favorite faculty member from his time so far at USC, he quickly got back to us with a name: Patrick Henry, Assistant Professor, Clinical Entrepreneurship and Director University Venturing Summit.

Professor Henry shared with us some of his thoughts about the value he sees in Bulat’s experience this summer:

"I'm not surprised that Bulat is enjoying and excelling as an intern in Singapore with Sage Corps. Bulat was a top student in my class at the Lloyd Greif Center and like so many of our international students - a true multinational entrepreneur who is confident and capable in any environment. I'm confident that the experience and skills he develops during his time with Sage Corps will benefit him throughout his career journey. Living abroad, interning, and experiencing cultures are such life-changing experiences for college students that I hope more students at USC can have similar immersion experiences."

Bulat hopes to work in San Francisco post-graduation, though potentially could see himself eventually coming back to Singapore to work.

Bulat, Haiwen, and their Singapore cohort at an event hosted by Vision Strategy Storytelling.

Bulat, Haiwen, and their Singapore cohort at an event hosted by Vision Strategy Storytelling.

Haiwen Chen

Haiwen is a sophomore studying Business Administration. This summer, he is working as a marketing intern for Nickel.to, a Fintech company in Singapore that provides money transfer services via a proprietary FX platform using cryptocurrencies. Some of his responsibilities include content creation for the company website, market analysis, and general business development.

Name one of the biggest challenges you’ve successfully overcome this summer.

"One of the biggest challenges that I’ve successfully overcome this summer was learning “Singlish,” a combination of Chinese, English, and Malay. I am fluent in Chinese and English but it took me a long time to understand. My peers also teach me Singlish terms during lunch and social hours."

Why did you decide to participate in Sage Corps?

"I decided to participate in Sage Corps because of my interest in entrepreneurship. Working for a startup is a unique experience because I get to learn about how a business grows from an innovative idea to a product in the market."

What is the most valuable lesson/ most valuable skill you’ve learned or strengthened while abroad in your city?

"The most valuable lesson I’ve learned in Singapore is to be open and accepting. Singapore is a very well-developed and well-integrated society where different cultures combine and produce a unique one. This summer experience makes me more determined about my goal to work in Singapore in the future."

Haiwen is still figuring out what exactly he would like to do after graduation, but as of now he is hoping to work in Singapore in the technology industry.

As this summer is drawing to a close, we can’t wait to see what Bulat, Haiwen, and the rest of their USC peers are able to accomplish in the remaining weeks of their fellowships. We know that they will continue to achieve great things when they return to the University of Southern California this fall as they continue to develop their careers. Who knows - we may even find their names among other USC alumni entrepreneurs one day!

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University Spotlight: Pennsylvania State University

We’re excited to continue with our University Spotlight posts, and this one’s all about Pennsylvania State University! This summer, we have Nittany Lions all over the world participating in our summer fellowship program.

This blog post features four of them and their adventures in their respective cities. Keep reading to learn more about the exciting work they’ve been doing!

Peter Barrows

Peter is currently in Hong Kong interning for Acoustic Metamaterials Group, a smart materials and acoustics company that is changing the way people interact with sound. His main responsibilities include contacting manufacturers in China and ordering a variety of parts/materials with detailed specifications, researching university projects and startup companies that could be potential customers for the company, and modeling objects in CAD.

Peter graduated in spring 2017 with a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering.

Name one of your biggest wins of the summer.

“One of my biggest wins would have to be just being able to go to Hong Kong, eat good food, and explore a place I’ve never been.”

How has this experience helped you get closer to achieving your post-graduation/ career goals?

“This experience has gotten me closer to my post grad goals by actually giving me some experience in my field that I can also put on my resume, but also through hearing the opinions of other people that are not like me. Some of the events I’ve been to for orientation told me exactly what I need to hear when it comes to achieving my dream, mainly being that this is the time in my life to take risks, and to just go for it.”

What’s the most fun/ coolest thing you’ve done with your cohort so far this summer?

“The most fun things I’ve done have probably just been eating a bunch of random food I’ve never had before, exploring the city, and going to random events like small local concerts of music I can’t even understand. There’s so much happening here in Hong Kong that I never get bored.”

Since Peter recently graduated, he plans to gain as much experience in the mechanical engineering field as he can to decide what career path interests him the most.

Jonathan Gunczler

Jonathan is spending his summer in Chicago as an intern at OneIMS. Here, he works on inbound sales projects and uses his background in industrial engineering to develop more efficient processes for the company.

Jonathan is a rising junior in the College of Engineering majoring in Industrial Engineering.

Name one of your biggest wins of the summer.

“Definitely being given the lead in a reorganization project, which was a big responsibility but I feel I handled it well.”

What is the most valuable lesson/ most valuable skill you’ve learned or strengthened during your internship?

“Thinking about your decisions but not second guessing yourself if that makes sense.”

Why did you decide to participate in Sage Corps?

“I have always wanted to start a business of my own and this was a great opportunity to learn from entrepreneurs.”

Jonathan hopes to find a full-time position in his field upon graduation.

Jonathan and the Chicago cohort at their fellowship orientation.

Jonathan and the Chicago cohort at their fellowship orientation.

Kirsty Moir

Kirsty is in Buenos Aires working as a Marketing and Business Development intern for a 3D printing company called Trimaker. Kirsty crates all of the content for Trimaker’s newest model, the Cosmos 2, through graphic and published flyers and prochures. She also is working on developing a public relations and content marketing strategy for the company’s newest startup venture.

She is a rising senior majoring in Public Relations and minoring in English.

Name one of the biggest challenges you’ve successfully overcome this summer.

“I’ve never traveled outside the U.S. before, so it was definitely a challenge for me to acclimate myself in a completely new environment. What made it the most difficult to adjust was the language barrier, since I came into Argentina only knowing how to speak minimal Spanish. I’ve always had a naturally bad sense of direction, so there were many times in the beginning when I got lost and had to ask strangers for help. I had to trust my gut with the minimal Spanish I knew how to translate in their responses to find my way back home safely.

Luckily, I adjusted to the culture and learned Spanish rather quickly after conversing with locals. Porteños (the name for the locals here in Buenos Aires) are very friendly and are always open to teaching you their language and culture!”

Why did you decide to participate in Sage Corps?

“I decided to participate in Sage Corps because I was at a crucial point in my life and in my college career where I needed a change of direction, one that would broaden my horizons and give me a newfound sense of clarity. I needed an experience that would help me grow in all aspects of life, both professionally and personally, and that’s not something I thought I would get out of a regular summer internship where I’d commute from home every day. Sage Corps provided an amazing and unique opportunity for me and I was not going to let it pass me by.”

What's the most fun/ coolest thing you've done with your cohort so far this summer?

“The coolest thing I’ve done with my cohort so far this summer is visit Municipio de Tigre. It’s this beautiful little town with a bunch of local shops with cobblestone roads, and there’s a small river that runs through the town where countless boats dock.”

When reflecting on her fellowship, Kirsty explained, “Sage Corps is a wonderful experience and I am blessed every day to know I was given such an incredible opportunity. This program could not have fallen into my lap at a more perfect time in my life, and I wouldn’t trade all the memories, friends, and connections I’ve made for anything. I will surely take all that I’ve gained from my short two months here in Buenos Aires with me into the professional world for years to come.”

Kirsty’s favorite advisor at PSU, Julie Miller, Manager of Internships in the Department of Career Services, offered her insights on the importance of international immersion experiences for students at the university.

“We feel strongly that experiences outside the classroom, both internships and studying abroad, are vitally important to our students’ development. We have seen students' success rates soar when they take opportunities to gain hands-on skills in professional settings, not only making themselves more marketable post-graduation, but learning about themselves in the process. The study abroad experience, or even combined abroad internships also result in that outstanding personal growth across the board.”

Upon graduation, Kirsty plans to pursue a career at an agency or small firm in the communications industry, ideally as a copywriter.

Ashley Khorassani

Ashley is currently in Amsterdam, The Netherlands interning with Motoshare, a motorcycle sharing platform. It is currently the only motorcycle sharing platform in Europe! Ashley's main responsibility is conducting market research in preparation for an international rollout.

Ashley is a rising senior studying Economics and minoring in Political Science.

Name one of your biggest wins of the summer.

"Meeting like-minded people who have similar goals and interests within my cohort has been probably been the biggest win of the summer. I expected to love Amsterdam but meeting other students that are easy to get along with was a huge benefit."

Why did you decide to participate in Sage Corps?

"I decided to participate in Sage Corps for the international work experience as well as also being exposed to a startup culture. I think that me and other students my age like to work in environments that are laid back and where our work is valued. Sage Corps offered both so I knew that I was interested in this program."

How has this experience helped you get closer to achieving your post-graduation/career goals?

"I think that working here temporarily showed me that I would like to experience working in other countries in Europe and other parts of the world because I really enjoy meeting different types of people."

After graduation, Ashley will be looking for a full-time position in either consulting or as a business analyst. She eventually looks forward to earning an MBA.

Ashley in Amsterdam

Ashley in Amsterdam

This summer, we had a group of ten PSU fellows participate in our fellowship program! We’re excited to see how this experience will help them pursue their professional goals. Whatever they do next, Sage Corps will be here to support them and help them succeed!

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University Spotlight: Northwestern University

Whether they’re enjoying Dillo day, cheering on Chicago's Big Ten Team, or spending time on the Lakefill, the Wildcats are living the good life in Evanston.

But, what about their experiences off-campus? When they’re not in Evanston, where in the world are the Wildcats and what are they doing?

Keep reading to find out about three Northwestern students and their adventures this summer as Sage Corps fellows.

 Griffin Bourjaily

Griffin is living in Chicago this summer and working as an intern at Coder, a venture development services startup. He is currently working with one of Coder's main clients, a mobile platform that assists veterans with the transition into civilian life, and is creating a suite of investor materials for the founder and a pricing package for the company. He is also developing marketing and expansion strategies for Coder to improve the company's sales initiatives. Griffin is a rising senior majoring in Economics and minoring in Business.

Name one of your biggest wins of the summer.

"Finishing a financial model for the veteran services client that took us two weeks to find the data to back up our claims."

What is the most valuable lesson/ most valuable skill you’ve learned or strengthened during your internship?

"I would say my technical skills related to strategic thinking."

How has this experience helped you get closer to achieving your post-graduation/ career goals?

"I think Sage Corps not only looks great on a resume, but also gives students an opportunity to learn about a whole new industry that they wouldn't normally have access to. Without Sage Corps, I don't know if I would've been able to break into the tech startup industry unless I decided to create my own startup down the road. However, I am now more prepared for that path and know the ins and outs of the tech industry."

What's the most fun/ coolest thing you've done with your cohort so far this summer?

"I would say the Startup Grind event powered by Google Entrepreneurs. We helped decide what startup would receive funding which is really cool to be in that position."

Griffin plans to pursue a career in management consulting upon graduation.

Ezequiel Linares

Zeke is currently in Buenos Aires working as an investment research analyst intern at Wayra, Telefonica’s startup accelerator and venture capital fund that focuses on seed investments. Zeke has a variety of responsibilities at Wayra but is currently working on analyzing the company’s portfolio companies and finding feasible fundraising opportunities for the group’s entrepreneurs. He uses Wayra’s consolidated database of Latin American Venture Capital funds and Angels to match compatible entrepreneurs and investors.

Zeke is a rising junior majoring in Industrial Engineering, minoring in Business Institutions, and pursuing a certificate in Entrepreneurship.

Why did you decide to participate in Sage Corps?

“Initially, I was tied between doing a domestic internship and wanting to study abroad this summer. I decided to participate in Sage Corps because it strikes a good balance between the two different experiences I was seeking. Outside of connecting me with an incredible internship opportunity, Sage Corps provided me a really cool cohort to explore Buenos Aires with and an engaged Country Manager who is always on call for any questions. More importantly, though, Juan, our Country Manager, has been able to set my cohort up with amazing professional opportunities to network with companies such as KMPG, Google, and an awesome co-working space called La Maquinita.”

What is the most valuable lesson/ most valuable skill you’ve learned or strengthened while abroad in your city?

“The most valuable lesson that I have learned while abroad in my city is that good stories are waiting to be made. Sometimes the best nights are the spontaneous ones that weren't planned earlier that day. So always be open minded to any activities and you'll be surprised at how fun they end up being.”

How has this experience helped you get closer to achieving your post-graduation/ career goals?

“This experience has helped me get closer to achieving my career goals because it has given me the ability to immerse myself in an entirely new situation and forced me to think quickly on my feet. I believe that regardless of the career path that I end up going down, the global perspective I will have developed by the end of my 8-week journey will prove useful in helping me think outside the box when confronted with any difficult problem-solving scenarios.”

 Name one of your biggest wins of the summer.

“One of my biggest wins of the summer thus far was attending an exclusive event hosted by Google for Entrepreneurs at AreaTres, which is a co-working space in Palermo Soho. There was delicious food, fantastic drinks, and live music. Not to mention an uncanny amount of networking. By the end of the night, I was able to connect with a couple of gentlemen who received an award at the most recent NASA Hackathon and am now currently in the works of sourcing them as an investment opportunity for Wayra."

Post-gradation, Zeke plans to enter the consulting field and work as a management consultant.

Zeke and his cohort enjoying the local culture in Buenos Aires.

Ignacio de Osma

Like Griffin, Ignacio is currently interning at Coder Inc. in Chicago. Some of his responsibilities include developing the financial forecasts for one Coder's clients, working on Coder's cryptocurrencies initiatives, and working on a "venture challenge," in which he and a colleague were given an idea and had to prepare for a mock investor pitch. 

Ignacio is majoring in Economics and Mathematics and minoring in computer science.

Why did you decide to participate in Sage Corps?

I decided to participate in Sage Corps because it provided me the opportunity to learn from a completely new experience and hence gain new skills, and at the same time meet new and amazing people!

Name one of your biggest wins of the summer.

Although I have gained many skills, both technical and personal, I believe the biggest win was meeting the people I work with. I think the friendships I have established will last longer than anything else.

What is the most valuable lesson/ most valuable skill you’ve learned or strengthened during your internship?

I believe the most valuable lesson I learned during my internship was the ability to perform a decent outcome in an unknown situation.

What is the most valuable lesson/ most valuable skill you’ve learned or strengthened while in your city?

Although I reside in Illinois, I had the opportunity to know people from very different places. Therefore, I had the opportunity to gain insight into different cultures and ways of life.

Although Ignacio doesn't have any concrete post-graduation plans, he feels that his Sage Corps fellowship helped him gain skills that will be transferable to any of his future careers.

So, there you have it! As you can see, Zeke, Griffin, and Ignacio are making tangible, practical contributions to their startups this summer and building valuable professional skills. We’re excited to see where this journey takes them!

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University Spotlight: University of Pennsylvania

As a Penn alum, I’m admittedly biased whenever I get to brag about those students in our global entrepreneurship program. Years later (I won’t date myself), I still vividly remember my time on campus, and of course my semester abroad in Spain. After graduating with degrees in Spanish and International Relations, I then spent a year in South America. These global experiences later inspired me to build a law career representing Latin American clients. But, when I was a 22 year old living in Buenos Aires, I never imagined that I would one day commit my career to helping students from my alma mater (and 75 other universities) have their own global experiences.

Since launching our program in 2013, we’ve had 29 Penn students participate, with 7 in our summer cohort this year. After Sage Corps, these students have gone on to incredible professional opportunities at consulting firms, top tech companies, VC funds, Fortune 500 companies, and of course startups. Others have even started their own companies shout out to Woveon and co-founder Adam Rawot. But today I’m excited to share the experiences of two Penn students, Nicole Profit and Eric Zeng, currently abroad in our 2017 summer cohort.

Nicole Profit

Nicole, a junior in the Wharton School, is a data science intern for Northraine, a predictive analytics R&D and consulting firm in Melbourne, Australia. Her client projects this summer include: (1) researching different platforms for creating chatbots for Facebook Messenger and storing user interactions with the chatbot; and (2) working on a biotechnology project for which she codes functions that can efficiently detect and remove all of the extraneous features in the scans of pregnant women.

Name one of your biggest wins of the summer.

"My biggest win this summer has been successfully presenting the research I had been doing on chatbots to a client who was interested in using a chatbot for her company’s Facebook page."

Name one of the biggest challenges you’ve successfully overcome this summer.

"The biggest challenge that I’ve overcome this summer has been learning how to write simple functions in a new [software] programming language."

What is the most valuable lesson/ most valuable skill you’ve learned or strengthened during your internship?

"This internship has taught me how to write code in Javascript and Python, two languages I didn’t know at the beginning of the summer."

How has this experience helped you get closer to achieving your post-graduation/ career goals?

"This experience has helped me get closer to achieving my career goals by providing me with invaluable experience in technical analysis." 

What's the most fun/ coolest thing you've done with your cohort so far this summer?

"So far, our cohort has gone to the Eureka Tower, one of the tallest buildings in the world. The view of Melbourne from the top of the tower was truly amazing. We also went to see the Twelve Apostles, a beautiful collection of limestone stacks by the Great Ocean Road. Seeing a kangaroo hop across the road on our road trip to see the Twelve Apostles was one of the coolest moments on the trip."

Upon graduation, Nicole hopes to work in business analytics role.

Nicole and her cohort visiting the Great Ocean Road.

Nicole and her cohort visiting the Great Ocean Road.

Eric Zeng

Eric is a rising sophomore in the Engineering School studying Electrical Engineering. He is currently in Hong Kong working as an electrical engineering intern at Ampd Energy, which offers a state-of-the-art lithium-ion battery energy storage solution across home, commercial and industrial applications. At Ampd Energy, Eric performs a variety of testing on components in the company’s electrical system.

What is the most valuable lesson/ most valuable skill you’ve learned or strengthened during your internship?

"To always ask questions, no matter what. If you sit by and do not ask, you will not do anything meaningful. Even if you think you are bothering your coworkers, it is better to have the right information than to work in the wrong direction."

Why did you decide to participate in Sage Corps?

"I chose Sage Corps because it offered me a vacation and work experience in one. I could explore a city that many of my friends had recommended to me while experiencing my first professional tech environment."

What is the most valuable lesson/ most valuable skill you’ve learned or strengthened while abroad in your city?

"Enjoy the view. Foreign cities are beautiful in their unique ways. Being able to slow down within a hectic schedule is essential to maintaining a feeling of balance in an unfamiliar environment."

What's the most fun/ coolest thing you've done with your cohort so far this summer?

"Getting dinner. Really, the food is so good here."

How has this experience helped you get closer to achieving your post-graduation/ career goals?

"It has given me a taste of industry-level work and what electrical engineering is like in the real world. It has helped me decide what my major is, as well as what kind of a worker I am."

Eric is considering several paths after graduation, including graduate school or joining a more established tech company. Now that he has a taste of the startup life, he’ll consider that option, but he’s not quite ready to launch his own venture, he says.

It has been great to watch Eric and Nicole grow both personally and professionally this summer. My team and I are excited to see what lies ahead for these two fellows as well as our other Penn fellows!

 

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Vivatech Victory

Camila (left) with her Paris cohort.

Camila (left) with her Paris cohort.

This blog piece was written Camila Kaplunov, one of our Summer 2017 Paris fellows, and edited by Sarah Rudd, our summer marketing intern.

When I arrived in Paris as a Sage Corps fellow, I was pleasantly surprised by the amount of orientation programs, networking events, and activities that Sage Corps had arranged for our cohort. One orientation activity that sticks out to me as being particularly beneficial was the “pitch” practice that we participated in during our first few days of the program.

My orientation leader, Milette, taught us how to formally start a conversation with a business owner, and gave us a step-by-step explanation how to come up with a 30 second pitch. She mentioned the importance of covering topics such as an introduction about ourselves, an explanation of why we were at the conference, what we were looking to get out of it, and how we could potentially benefit whatever company we were pitching ourselves to. Then, she gave all of the fellows five minutes to draft a practice pitch to deliver to the rest of the group. By doing this, Milette helped us get out of us our comfort zones. By having the opportunity to practice my pitch with this activity, I was able to solidify my final delivery for the place where it mattered the most: Vivatech.

To say that Vivatech was overwhelming would be an understatement. As a 19 year old college student with limited experience networking, socializing with well-established CEO’s, and delivering myself as a potential employee, I felt like I was in over my head (to say the least). It took me awhile to get accustomed to the hustle and bustle of such a large-scale, immersive networking event like Vivatech. Especially as a non-French speaking American student, facilitating simple conversation became a nearly impossible task.

Eventually, a nice gentleman approached me, extended his hand out and said, “Hello, I am Sabri. What brings you to Vivatech this afternoon?” I was excited that I finally had an opportunity to practice my networking skills! I extended my hand, gave a firm shake, and began to deliver my long-awaited pitch. After handing me his card, Sabri said goodbye and went on with his day; it wasn't until later that I realized he was the founder of TEDxParis. Without Sage Corps’ attention to detail in getting us prepared for such a large-scale networking event like Vivatech, I honestly don't think I would have ever mustered the confidence to carry on a conversation with such an esteemed individual like Sabri.

I left that conversation with a pep in my step. I had attempted networking for the very first time and found a newfound sense of confidence to take on the rest of the conference with ease. I swept back and forth from the crowded aisles of the “startup” sections, confidently describing myself to potential employers; it was exhilarating.

As time went on, I began to get quite comfortable with what once seemed to be the impossible task of socializing with strangers in a foreign country; I found myself getting used to the world of networking. Whether or not you're new to networking or job hunting, there are three takeaways I would like to share with you from my experience at Vivatech. Hopefully you can learn a little bit from my personal experience.

1. “Smile and Shake.” You never know how far a bright smile and firm handshake can take you in the competitive world of business.

2. Don't be afraid to be on your own. Often times, young students like me can be intimidated by the thought of speaking to strangers. However, it’s important to take advantage of any opportunity you have to have a meaningful conversation. So go out on your own and take on the big bad world of networking. You’d be surprised with the amount of people you will meet and, better yet, potential friends, co-workers, or even future bosses.

3. Lastly, have fun! I wish I didn't have to be so cliche, but I would hate myself if I did not add this very important piece of advice in. So many people lose themselves in the act of networking. Yes, networking can get very aggressive and can provoke a lot of emotions. But, making an effort to enjoy the process of meeting new people not only makes the experience more enjoyable for you, but also for the person you are speaking to.

So, what are you waiting for? Get out there and start networking!

 

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University Spotlight: University of Michigan

As the saying goes, “Wherever you go, Go Blue.” This couldn’t be more true for our University of Michigan fellows. This summer alone, 18 Michigan undergraduates and recent graduates are spread across nine cities around the world (Berlin, Buenos Aires, Chicago, Dublin, Hong Kong, Melbourne, New York, Paris, and Sydney), bringing the total number of University of Michigan participants in our program to 35 since 2014.

As a proud Michigan alumna myself, I can’t help but say “Go Blue” to that!

We at Sage Corps HQ decided to speak with several current Michigan fellows to hear about their summers firsthand.

Read on to learn about the innovative work they’ve done and the amazing experiences they’ve had!

Rebecca Sinha

Rebecca is currently interning in Buenos Aires at Flimper, a tech startup that provides advertising and marketing services to large companies like Sprint, Verizon, and Facebook through the use of Twitter. Rebecca helps with blogs, analyzing the success of campaigns by writing cases studies, and reaching out to contacts in New York to secure new clients.

She just finished her freshman year at Michigan.

Why did you decide to participate in Sage Corps?

“This program was highly recommended by my friends at Michigan, and I wanted to study and travel abroad this summer.”

 How has this experience helped you get closer to achieving your post-graduation/ career goals?

“This experience gave me an exact idea of what life is like in the cooperate world, and what it is like to work at a startup company.”

What is the most valuable lesson/ most valuable skill you’ve learned or strengthened while abroad in your city?

“I believe the most valuable lesson I have learned is to always be open to new things and experiences, but proceed with caution and be aware of your surroundings.”

At this time, Rebecca plans to attend medical school or obtain a Master’s degree in Public Health or Business upon graduation.

Mikey Trahan

Mikey, a rising sophomore in the Ross School of Business, is currently Down Under in Sydney. He is a marketing and business strategy intern at Woveon, a software customer service company that implements AI and ML into its software to make customer service processes at companies quick and easy. His responsibilities include content marketing and attending networking events with the CTO to increase brand awareness.

Name one of your biggest wins of the summer.

“My biggest win of the summer has simply been coming to Sydney. I have always wanted to come to Australia and Sage Corps gave me this great opportunity.”

Name one of the biggest challenges you’ve successfully overcome this summer.

“I guess the biggest challenge was basically being dropped off in a new country and just figuring everything out. It took about 2 days to get used to this new culture.”

What is the most valuable lesson/ most valuable skill you’ve learned or strengthened while abroad in your city?

“You have to be adaptable. Our cohort is from all over the US and comes from very different backgrounds so you have to change plans and go with the flow.”

When asked who his favorite Michigan instructor is, Mikey immediately responded with Sarah Zimmerman, LEO Lecturer of Business Communication and Lecturer of Executive Education at the Ross School of Business. Sarah earned her MBA with honors from the University of Toledo.

She offered her insights into the power of an international internship for Mikey and his classmates.

"Working abroad changed my life, so I encourage my students to consider going abroad early in their lives too. Immersive foreign internship programs allow participants to see new industry and cultural approaches in action, and programs with administrative support can allow students—and parents—to feel more at ease."

Mikey would like to work at a large bank doing mergers and acquisitions upon graduation, perhaps even in Sydney.

Mikey and his cohort smiling in Sydney. 

Mikey and his cohort smiling in Sydney. 

Jason Pi

Jason is working in Buenos Aires as a graphic design intern at Viaedu, a company that replaces costly in-person career counseling with an online test designed to assist students in choosing a career path best suited for them.

He is a rising sophomore in the Stamps School of Design.

Name one of your biggest wins of the summer.

“Being able to come to this program has been the largest win thus far. I couldn't imagine spending our notorious four months of summer stuck at home.”

What is the most valuable lesson/ most valuable skill you’ve learned or strengthened during your internship?

“It's only been three weeks so far, but I've learned that the people are the most important part of a startup, not the idea. Any idea could be made brilliant, but only if the team is capable of doing so.”

What's the most fun/ coolest thing you've done with your cohort so far this summer?

“I went to a private networking event hosted by Google with two other fellows, where we listened to music, played ping pong, and talked to lots of cool people.”

After graduating, Jason plans to first take a year to travel the world.

William Juang

Like Mikey, William is interning in Sydney this summer. He works at FreightExchange, an online logistics company offering interstate freight transport via road, rail, sea and air freight services and solutions across Australia. At FreightExchange, William diagnoses and fixes problems on the company website and is also developing a chatbot to help the company streamline its customer service efforts.

He graduated in May 2017 with a Bachelor of Science in Information Sciences and a minor in Statistics.

Why did you decide to participate in Sage Corps?

“I did not get the chance to study abroad my freshman and sophomore years in college, so as a student that just graduated I felt that this would be one of the few opportunities left to do so.”

Name one of your biggest wins of the summer.

“Living right next to Bondi Beach, one of the best beaches in the world (even though it is winter here).”

How has this experience helped you get closer to achieving your post-graduation/ career goals?

“After interning at a big company last year I felt like I wasn't making enough of an impact and working at a startup is a complete 360. Also, this internship confirmed that I am going down a path that will continue to interest and challenge me in the future.”

During William’s time at Michigan, he had one instructor in the School of Information, Colleen Van Lent, who really impacted his education. Colleen earned her Ph.D. in Computer Science and is a Lecturer IV in the School.

She shared her ideas on William’s participation in Sage Corps with us.

"Despite the current pressure among college students to maintain a high GPA, I always encourage my students to relax about grades and instead focus on the many experiences they can access at Michigan outside the classroom. The Sage Corps program looks like a great fit for UMSI alum. The majority of our students want to take the risks and do something outside the box. William was a student of mine in 2015 and I am not surprised to see him doing a program like this. He has that great combination of technical skills, combined with an eagerness to work as part of a diverse team on challenging problems."

William plans to pursue a Master’s degree in Business Analytics. 

Katie Casselton

In Dublin this summer, Katie is interning at Groopeze, a software platform that makes the management and payment of group bookings easier for consumers. She is helping the company launch its new website, create content, and develop a marketing strategy.

Katie is a rising junior majoring in Industrial Engineering and minoring in Entrepreneurship.

Why did you decide to participate in Sage Corps?

“I wanted to do an internship but also wanted to study abroad, so this was the best of both worlds.”

What is the most valuable lesson/ most valuable skill you’ve learned or strengthened during your internship?

“The most valuable lesson is to learn how to be proactive and find things to do. Often startups don’t have the resources to have someone give you tasks constantly, so helping out where I can and volunteering to assist on projects is important.”

What's the most fun/ coolest thing you've done with your cohort so far this summer?

“My cohort and I went to Galway, and we hiked out in the country and found the ruins of a castle. It was completely abandoned and we were the only ones there, so it was really cool to explore that.”

Although she is unsure of her exact plans upon graduating, Katie hopes to be working in a business development or business analytics role.

Katie and her cohort enjoying the scenery in Dublin.

Katie and her cohort enjoying the scenery in Dublin.

Even though all of these fellows come from the same university, it is clear that their fellowship experiences have been totally different! Living and working abroad means different things to different people, and our team loves what we do because we get to see how each student benefits from our program in his or her own way.

We know that Rebecca, Mikey, Jason, Katie, William, and the 13 other Sage Corps summer 2017 Michigan fellows will find success in their future professional endeavors— and we will be here to support them every step of the way!

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Fellow Spotlight: Tudor Dorobantu

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This blog post was written by Sarah Rudd, Sage Corps' summer marketing intern.

At Sage Corps, we strongly believe that interning with a tech startup can be an invaluable, life-changing experience. Nothing makes us happier than knowing that our fellows have meaningful, eye-opening experiences in the field of entrepreneurship. Take Tudor Dorobantu, for example. He’s a Romanian student studying at Boston University who came to Chicago to work with a startup, Sente, and was then sent to Istanbul to help train international startups for the company's summer “Internet of Things” program.

Sounds pretty cool, right? I sat down with Tudor to hear more about his experience.

About Sente

According to the company's Facebook page, Sente is “an 1871 Chicago based international accelerator for startups in Turkey, Nordics, Balkans and other emerging startup ecosystems.” It was founded in 2008 by Serhat Cicekoglu (CEO). Gerod Carfantan joined the company in July 2016, as the COO, and the company now has grown to six employees.

Sente helps provide incubation and business development services for startups. The company launches a series of programs for selected startups to help them become successful businesses. Sente is currently running its “Internet of Things” program, which is in its sixth week out of 12. In August it will launch its “LandInChicago” program, followed by its “New Mobility” program in September. Through its programming, the company has helped more than two hundred startups grow and develop.

A bit more about Tudor

Born and raised in Bucharest, Romania, Tudor is a rising senior at Boston University studying Finance and Information Systems with a minor in Computer Science. Tudor is the VP of Tutoring for the university’s Financial Modeling club, and he credits his involvement with this organization for providing him with helpful experience in financial modeling.

Tudor felt that an American internship would be beneficial to his career, and that’s when he found Sage Corps.

“I got an email from Sage Corps and was intrigued. I liked the idea of being paired with someone with experience in the field.”

He ultimately applied to the Sage Corps Summer 2017 program in Chicago and was placed as an analyst intern with Sente.

From Chicago to Istanbul

Tudor joined Sente right as the team was leaving for Istanbul to kick off its “Internet of Things” program.

“[Sente] selected 11 companies, and the program kicked off in Istanbul. We gather the entrepreneurs from all over the world, but a lot are from Istanbul and throughout Europe. We had a few workshops for the companies, outlined the expectations of the six weeks, we started to coach them how to build a business plan and financial model, and we gave them a crash course on how to pitch their idea. After that me and my coworkers helped with refined deliverables, financial model and presentations and due diligence.”

Tudor also explained that his role in Istanbul was to help give real advice to real startups and help them build their businesses.

“I was there to aid the entrepreneurs with questions regarding the deliverables, and help them complete them. One bigger task was looking at comparable companies with public information to help value the companies we work with. It doesn’t have to be perfect but we look at the analogs as a baseline to help model the business itself with revenue and costs. I also helped with qualitative research, for example on the industry, using frameworks, a general outlying description of their market (business model - B2B or B2C,  and revenue model (subscription, sell product once). Great professional experience in dealing with clients and resolving their problems with solutions you come up with. Monday through Friday from 8am to 6pm that was what I did, I counseled them. ”

Takeaways

From both his time in Istanbul and with Sente in general, Tudor has already been able to identify the benefits of working for a globalized startup. Prior to working with Sente, Tudor held a corporate internship with KPMG Romania, and he was able to notice an immediate difference in the responsibilities he was given and the room for potential growth in each position.

“Here I am needed. My superiors look at me and see how I perform and can see that I’m capable; I’m able to counsel the startups and advise them on issues regarding their business. In Istanbul I started coaching the entrepreneurs and one of them came to me and his business model didn’t fit for the US at all - he was Serbian. It was a flood warning program that I didn’t think would work in the US because we already have billion of dollars invested in our own warning programs. He needed help, and I came and talked to him and gave him some ideas like, “why don’t you put apply it to warning systems at colleges and universities?” At the end of the day, he said that I gave him confidence to continue on with his idea. I made an impact on a real person.”

Just as Tudor only had good things to say about his experience with Sente, Gerod, the company’s COO, had similar praise for Tudor. He said,

"We see sente.link as the connection point between startups, investors and institutions in different parts of the world. So, it’s important for us to have people on the team that can bring in a diverse experience and diverse cultural backgrounds. As an international student with life experience in both the US and Romania, Tudor is a great fit. He’s also been able to contribute immediately – as a startup ourselves and the fact we work with so many startups, it’s given him the ability to both contribute with his strong analytical skills and also learn quite a bit about a lot of different sides of the business, plus experience the energy of the City of Chicago. Overall I think it’s been a great experience for both Sente and for Tudor."

When I asked how his experience with Sente, specifically in Istanbul, may have affected his future career aspirations, Tudor said,

“I definitely want to work somewhere in the VC field - I know it’s very competitive - but depending on what types of skills and professional connections I build here, hopefully it will help me get there!”

He also said that is is now more interested in a future position that involves working with people.

“I was always a numbers guy, but working with people is definitely more interesting connecting with the entrepreneurs. In terms of professional skill development, it was really important for me to start developing skills related to client interactions. With a finance or consulting track, a lot of my work will involve client interactions, and you will need the ability to effectively and succinctly communicate your ideas. It’s all about communication.”

We are excited to have played a role in Tudor’s internship experience, and are excited to continue to help our fellows to reach a new level of professional growth, and a widened exposure to the globalized workplace.

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Women in the startup world: entering a male-dominated industry

This post is for all of our young female readers hoping to enter/ advance in the startup world. Maybe you already have your foot in the door somewhere, or maybe you know nothing about the industry but want to start somewhere. Either way, this is for you. We hope that this post becomes a resource to help you navigate the fast-paced, ever-changing industry you love so much.

When discussing women in the startup industry, it’s difficult to ignore the shortage of us within it. According to an article recently published in the Observer, women own only 5 percent of startups, and only 7 percent of partners at top 100 venture capital firms are female. The same article also stated that women hold only 11 percent of executive positions at Silicon Valley companies.

So, it’s no secret that the startup world continues to be male-dominated.

But, since when were women scared or intimidated to enter a male-dominated industry? Did Leslie Knope give up her political aspirations because of the sexism she faced from her fellow city council members? No! Olivia Pope, despite the constant challenges she faces of being a powerful woman in Washington, never quits either. And neither does Daenerys Targaryen, who is still fighting to become Queen of the Seven Kingdoms. Yes, these are all fictional characters. But the point is, it doesn’t take long to find examples of successful women in male-dominated industries who didn’t give up on their dreams.

This includes the startup industry. For example, take Kara Scanlin and Sharon Latour.

Kara is Co-founder and CEO of Lystr, based in Chicago. Lystr is a connected home device that adds items to your grocery list for you. It’s WiFi connected, lives in your kitchen, and is able to scan items or listen to voice commands to build grocery lists that are automatically added to the Lystr application on a smartphone.

Across the world in Sydney, Australia, Sharon is CEO and Queen Bee at Marketing Bee, a marketing company that offers open-source web development and cloud based marketing. Marketing Bee’s signature program, Hivernate, is known as Australia’s first-ever cloud based marketing department.

Both Kara and Sharon are the leading executives at their respective companies; they manage their teams and are the top decision makers. If that’s not success in the startup industry, then what is?

With Kara and Sharon’s help, we’ve put together some tips and advice for all of you young women who aspire to one day become major players in the industry.

1. Find your mentor. This can be one of the most important things you’ll ever do for your career. Find someone in your life—a teacher, relative, older friend, or neighbor, for example, who you respect and who you get along with. If you don’t know a female entrepreneur, that’s okay. You don’t know one yet. This is the time for you to put yourself out there and connect with one. Reach out to female entrepreneurs in your community, or contact your existing network for any connections they may have. Don’t be scared to reach out for help—you may be surprised at how eager someone is to help you.

2. Find your team. In addition to having a mentor to guide you, you’ll want to have people who will work beside you. Find people who share your interests and those that don’t. It’s important to surround yourself with a group of people with different backgrounds and ideas because that’s how you’ll learn and gain new perspectives. Kara highlights that this is particularly important in the startup industry.

“Diversity of opinion is important for startups because we have so much to learn about our business, the opportunity, and our customers.”

Although you may not be in the stage of launching or running a startup, start surrounding yourself with a diverse group of people as early as you can!

3. Stay aware of industry happenings. If you’re applying to a college, it’s important to research that college and get your bearings before you write your personal statement, right? The same goes for any industry you’re trying to break into— especially one that has so many moving parts. Consistently read publications like Entrepreneur, TechCrunch, and Forbes to become more familiar with industry jargon and processes. Once you read insights from established entrepreneurs and VC experts, you’ll feel more grounded in the industry and have more tools in your belt. Not only will this make you more informed and help you become more strategic, but you'll also feel more confident!

4. Get involved. This is two-fold. Encourage young women and girls that you know to follow their passions for STEM and entrepreneurship. More young women interested in STEM and the startup industry can eventually mean more women in the industry. More women in the industry will lead to more women in executive roles and CEO positions. So, be a role model for the young women and girls in your life who want to follow in your footsteps. Also, put yourself out there. Get involved in entrepreneurship clubs or organizations at your school or in your community. If there isn’t one, consider starting one. You can also get involved online by joining LinkedIn groups, Facebook communities, and newsletter lists. Who knows? Your involvement with various entrepreneurship and STEM communities may spark your imagination and inspire an idea for your own company.

5. Keep on keeping on. Although you’re bound to face challenges and obstacles in your startup journey, it’s important to remember why you do what you do and what matters to you. Always give your best effort and produce the best results you can. Sharon and Kara sum it up perfectly.

Sharon explains, “Your work ethic is your weapon. The more you grow into your startup journey, the harder and the more complicated the challenges along the way, and the key attribute to solving those problems is to persevere and have an unbreakable work ethic.”

And Kara offers, “As a female founder, I think there's a lot to say for how you choose to look at it. You can choose to focus on the fact that women-run startups are funded less than men, or you can put your head down and work harder. I think it's all about who you are, not your gender. That's how I see myself and that's how our team operates.”

We hope that these tips help get you started on your startup journey! Entering a male-dominated industry certainly has its challenges for women, but remember that there are resources available and people in the industry that are here to help. Good luck to all of you—including our 59 female Sage Corps 2017 summer fellows— as you continue to work towards achieving your startup goals. It’s time to find your passion, build your vision, and get to work! 

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Alumni Spotlight: Olivia Rosen

This blog post was written by Sarah Rudd, Sage Corps' summer marketing intern.

When we say that Sage Corps provides access to an elite global network, we mean it.

About a year and a half ago, Olivia Rosen, a 2017 graduate of Dartmouth College, participated in Sage Corps’ Winter 2016 program and set out on a journey to Buenos Aires, where she worked with Wayra Argentina, a tech accelerator, as a consultant. This past April, she was notified by Sage Corps CEO Matt Meltzer of an opportunity to participate in a road trip campaign for WeatherHYDE, a product line connected with billionBricks. The campaign aimed to draw attention to their all-weather tents, which have been designed to help reduce global homelessness, by having participants camp across the United States in a WeatherHYDE tent and share their experiences on social media.

This opportunity immediately sparked Olivia’s interest, and she filled out an application with two of her friends. billionBricks had previously hosted Sage Corps fellows in Singapore, thus Matt was able to connect Olivia with its Founder and CEO, Prasoon Kumar, to discuss the road trip.

Olivia and her two friends, Sarah and Morgan, were ultimately selected to participate, and so their journey began.

When Olivia and I first spoke, she mentioned how inspired she was with billionBricks’ work and vision and how WeatherHYDE was designed to save thousands of lives. Little did she realise that she and her friends were an inspiration to us who took this challenge and felt a sense of commitment towards one of the most difficult social-economic problem to solve - homelessness. When I was their age, I could have never taken this step.
— Prasoon Kumar, Founder and CEO of billionBricks
From left to right: Sarah Guinee, Olivia Rosen, Morgan Finegan

From left to right: Sarah Guinee, Olivia Rosen, Morgan Finegan

We decided to reach out to Olivia to learn more about her once-in-a-lifetime trip. Here’s what she had to say:

Give us a rundown of your road trip. What was your day-to-day like? Who did you go with? Where did you go?

Our trip was 10 days long and spanned across 15 states - from Hanover, New Hampshire to Seattle, Washington! The three of us are close friends and sorority sisters who graduated this June from Dartmouth College. Some of the main highlights of the trip included Niagara Falls, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, downtown Chicago, Eaux Claire music festival in Wisconsin, Badlands National Park, Mount Rushmore, Yellowstone National Park, and Glacier National Park.

Why did you decide to do this road trip? Why did you want to work with billionBricks? How did you become involved with the organization?

We initially decided to do this trip because the three of us are all originally from the west coast and were eager to visit some of the incredible landmarks in the USA that we had never been to. We had the trip almost completely planned out when we saw Matt's post in the SageCorps Facebook group about billionBricks and the WeatherHYDE Wayfarer campaign. It was a perfect fit with our trip and we were all excited to find a way to give back and spread the word about a product with such an impactful mission. Shortly thereafter, we sent in our application to billionBRICKS and were excited to be selected as Summer 2017 WeatherHYDE wayfarers!

Can you speak more to the mission of billionBRICKS and why it matters to you?

The goal of the WeatherHYDE tents are to create spacious, durable, and sustainable solutions for homeless families. The tents are engineered to solve specific problems faced by the homeless - they are reversible to reflect or retain heat, spacious to hold a whole family, and designed to ensure privacy, sturdiness, and accessibility. The tents are also sold for recreational use, enabling retail customers to help homeless families with their purchases. This mission was really interesting to us because it simultaneously solves so many issues faced by the homeless while also employing a creative business model that attracts non-homeless customers as well. We feel that this product has the potential to make a pivotal difference in the lives of homeless people around the world and we were excited to spread the word through the Wayfarer campaign.

Sarah and Morgan with a WeatherHYDE tent

Sarah and Morgan with a WeatherHYDE tent

What were the most challenging and rewarding parts of this experience?

The most challenging part of this experience was figuring out the timing of everything- we had so many things we wanted to see and do along the way but also had to fit in many hours of driving (usually around 7-10 hours per day)!

The most rewarding part of this experience was seeing how many people were interested in the WeatherHYDE tents and the positive reactions to our social media outreach.

How did your participation as a Sage Corps fellow impact your decision to complete this road trip? How did your experience at Sage Corps impact your perspective on social justice, social change, and international humanitarian efforts?

Participating in Sage Corps furthered my interest in entrepreneurship and informed many of the academic and career choices I have made since completing the program. I am really interested in combining this interest with social impact and am excited that Sage Corps continues to provide additional ways for me to become involved with startups that have such incredible missions.

In your eyes, what was the most rewarding or valuable aspect of your Sage Corps fellowship?

My Sage Corps fellowship helped to give me the confidence to look for opportunities outside my comfort zone and feel more inclined to step up and put myself in innovative and challenging situations. It also reinforced my interest in entrepreneurship and gave me confidence to pursue career goals that are different from more common career paths.  

Were there any specific aspects of your time at Dartmouth that inspired or impacted your decision to participate in this road trip?

I took a Social Entrepreneurship course at Dartmouth last winter that inspired my interest in the ways that businesses can be created in order to sustainably address social issues.

What advice would you give to current and future Sage Corps fellows?

My advice would be to try to be fully present in everything you do - while at work, meeting people, and seeing the city— and not be distracted by what's happening back at home or elsewhere. There are so many unique experiences that the Sage Corps program brings and many of the most memorable and constructive moments stem from unexpected challenges and impromptu decisions.

Olivia in a WeatherHYDE tent

Olivia in a WeatherHYDE tent

What’s next for you?

I am moving to San Francisco this September and will start a job in tech and healthcare consulting.

How can Sage Corps fellows or the general public become involved with billionBricks?

Visit www.billionbricks.org to find out more information and share to help spread the word! Tents are available for recreational purchase as well as to donate.

We are always thrilled to hear stories of Sage Corps alumni seeking success after their time as a fellow. We can’t wait to see what other experiences the future holds for Olivia and the rest of the Sage Corps network!

Photos courtesy of @weatherhypegirlz

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5 tips for making the most of your summer internship

Congratulations! You made it through the application and interview processes and you landed an awesome internship! But, your work has just begun. How can you be sure you’re making the most of this opportunity? Here are five tips to get you started. 1. Speak up. Don’t be shy! It can be intimidating as an intern, but it’s important to speak your mind and contribute ideas to your team. Have ideas for a marketing plan or a business development pitch? Great! Make sure your team hears them. You were chosen for your internship because you were a strong applicant; your company values your skills and experience. If they didn’t, you wouldn’t have landed your internship. It’s time to show what you know! 2. Ask questions. No one at your company, no matter how long they’ve worked there or how senior they are, has all the answers to everything. Everyone asks questions at some point and needs help—that’s just part of life in the working world. Don’t assume that you’ll look stupid if you ask a question. In fact, your team will likely thank you for it. They’ll appreciate the thought you’ve put into solving a problem and the self-awareness you possess to know when you need additional support or clarification. At the end of the day, it’s better to ask a question than to continue with a task you’re unsure about. Matt Cortland, Sage Corps City Manager in Dublin and Founder of the Magical Pub & Inn suggests that interns ask their immediate supervisors very direct questions for support on tough assignments. He suggests, “You can always say, ‘Ok, so how would you approach this task/problem?’ This will almost always elicit a thoughtful response that lends the benefit of experience and gives you insight into how you should begin to work toward a solution." 3. Connect with people. It’s important to understand that your company isn’t just a brand offering a product or service. Remember that it’s also a group of people that thrives on interpersonal relationships and connections. So, get to know your team members. Make new friends in the lunchroom. Set up coffee chats with executives and other employees you may not come into contact with on a daily basis. This will help you gain insight into your company’s culture and workflow, making you better at your job. But, more importantly, if you do this, you’ll build a network of experienced professionals who may one day have a huge impact on your career. Never underestimate the power of a strong professional network! When asked about advice he would give summer interns, Sebastian Cadenas, CEO of Increase, an Argentina-based tech startup, replied, “My little piece of advice for interns is to always give their very best to what they do and to remember the importance of deeply connecting with people.” 4. Take notes. If you aren’t already, start carrying a notebook with you at work. And don’t just carry it, use it! Yes, carrying around a notebook will help you look proactive and organized—which is always a plus. But, it’s really important and useful to keep detailed notes about meetings and projects. Cortland says, "Have a notebook and pen with you all the time and take notes in meetings. It will make you more successful and help you recall specific details that are needed later." Chances are, if you hear something that you think you should remember, you’re probably right. There will be a lot of important details to remember throughout your internship, and to ensure that you don’t forget any of them, put pen to paper. Also, consider writing (or at least typing) a daily to-do list so none of your assignments fall through the cracks. 5. Be humble. Last, but certainly not least, this will help you become a successful member of any team. Personality matters. No one wants to work with an arrogant Scrooge. So, say thank you. A lot. When someone offers you a compliment, be gracious. When someone offers you constructive criticism, be gracious then, too. Don’t just ignore whatever criticism or feedback you may receive; these insights are valuable and often hold some degree of truth. Remember that while you do bring a lot to your company, you also have a lot of learning to do. Your summer internship is an opportunity for you to break out of your comfort zone and learn from people who are different than you. Yes, sometimes it may be stressful (as with any job.) But, you’ll also have the opportunity to teach those around you about your ideas and experience. Good luck, have fun, and work hard! And who knows, maybe one day you’ll have the opportunity to pass on your internship wisdom to an intern at your future startup.  

Congratulations! You made it through the application and interview processes and you landed an awesome internship! But, your work has just begun. How can you be sure you’re making the most of this opportunity? Here are five tips to get you started.

1. Speak up. Don’t be shy! It can be intimidating as an intern, but it’s important to speak your mind and contribute ideas to your team. Have ideas for a marketing plan or a business development pitch? Great! Make sure your team hears them. You were chosen for your internship because you were a strong applicant; your company values your skills and experience. If they didn’t, you wouldn’t have landed your internship. It’s time to show what you know!

2. Ask questions. No one at your company, no matter how long they’ve worked there or how senior they are, has all the answers to everything. Everyone asks questions at some point and needs help—that’s just part of life in the working world. Don’t assume that you’ll look stupid if you ask a question. In fact, your team will likely thank you for it. They’ll appreciate the thought you’ve put into solving a problem and the self-awareness you possess to know when you need additional support or clarification. At the end of the day, it’s better to ask a question than to continue with a task you’re unsure about.

Matt Cortland, Sage Corps City Manager in Dublin and Founder of the Magical Pub & Inn suggests that interns ask their immediate supervisors very direct questions for support on tough assignments. He suggests, “You can always say, ‘Ok, so how would you approach this task/problem?’ This will almost always elicit a thoughtful response that lends the benefit of experience and gives you insight into how you should begin to work toward a solution."

3. Connect with people. It’s important to understand that your company isn’t just a brand offering a product or service. Remember that it’s also a group of people that thrives on interpersonal relationships and connections. So, get to know your team members. Make new friends in the lunchroom. Set up coffee chats with executives and other employees you may not come into contact with on a daily basis. This will help you gain insight into your company’s culture and workflow, making you better at your job. But, more importantly, if you do this, you’ll build a network of experienced professionals who may one day have a huge impact on your career. Never underestimate the power of a strong professional network!

When asked about advice he would give summer interns, Sebastian Cadenas, CEO of Increase, an Argentina-based tech startup, replied, “My little piece of advice for interns is to always give their very best to what they do and to remember the importance of deeply connecting with people.”

4. Take notes. If you aren’t already, start carrying a notebook with you at work. And don’t just carry it, use it! Yes, carrying around a notebook will help you look proactive and organized—which is always a plus. But, it’s really important and useful to keep detailed notes about meetings and projects. Cortland says, "Have a notebook and pen with you all the time and take notes in meetings. It will make you more successful and help you recall specific details that are needed later."

Chances are, if you hear something that you think you should remember, you’re probably right. There will be a lot of important details to remember throughout your internship, and to ensure that you don’t forget any of them, put pen to paper.

Also, consider writing (or at least typing) a daily to-do list so none of your assignments fall through the cracks.

5. Be humble. Last, but certainly not least, this will help you become a successful member of any team. Personality matters. No one wants to work with an arrogant Scrooge. So, say thank you. A lot. When someone offers you a compliment, be gracious. When someone offers you constructive criticism, be gracious then, too. Don’t just ignore whatever criticism or feedback you may receive; these insights are valuable and often hold some degree of truth. Remember that while you do bring a lot to your company, you also have a lot of learning to do.

Your summer internship is an opportunity for you to break out of your comfort zone and learn from people who are different than you. Yes, sometimes it may be stressful (as with any job.) But, you’ll also have the opportunity to teach those around you about your ideas and experience. Good luck, have fun, and work hard!

And who knows, maybe one day you’ll have the opportunity to pass on your internship wisdom to an intern at your future startup.  

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Summer 2017 Cohort Announcement: Singapore

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We are so excited to announce our FINAL cohort for our Summer 2017 program!
Congrats & good luck to all of our fellows - we can't wait to see the awesome things that you accomplish this summer!

 

SINGAPORE SUMMER 2017 COHORT
 

Shefali Agarwal, Cornell University

Bulat Bayminov, University of Southern California

Same Bendary, Vanderbilt University

Jack Bosworth, Texas Christian University

Taiwan Chen, University of Southern California

Jae Hoon Lee, University of Southern California

Tommy Ng, New York University

Yiping Shen, Rice University

Jason Waye, University of Texas Dallas

Xueying Xu, Mount Holyoke College

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Summer 2017 Cohort Announcement: Santiago

We are so excited to announce our cohorts for our Summer 2017 program!
Be sure to check back tomorrow for our last city announcement!

 

SANTIAGO SUMMER 2017 COHORT
 

Karen Alcantar, Mount Holyoke College

Robert Beightler, University of Southern California

Henry Charman, Bucknell University

Isabel Damiani, University of California Berkeley

Clare Donohue, Indiana University Bloomington

Richard Edmunds, Vanderbilt University

Chris Flores, Pomona College

Greta Gasswint, Pennsylvania State University

Gabriel Hughes, University of California Los Angeles

Christopher Robinson, Harvard University

David Scaramucci, University of Notre Dame

Corrine Smith, Bucknell University

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Summer 2017 Cohort Announcement: Dublin

We are so excited to announce our cohorts for our Summer 2017 program!
Be sure to check back daily for a new city announcement. 

 

DUBLIN SUMMER 2017 COHORT
 

Akash Adani, University of Pennsylvania

Andrew Blower, University of Michigan

Sydney Brockman, Butler University

Christian Cannon, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Katharine Casselton, University of Michigan

Ryan Christensen, Arizona State University

Philip Chwistek, Pennsylvania State University

Brett Cotten, Pennsylvania State University

Nicolas CulineCalifornia Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Jonathan Greenfield, Vanderbilt University

Bryce Mbanefo, Princeton University

Max Roche, Amherst College

Trent Schillingford, Dartmouth College

Kimberly Tuttle, Claremont McKenna College

Eric Werbel, Duke University

Kazandra Zelaya, Claremont McKenna College

Albert Zhu, Duke University

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Summer 2017 Cohort Announcement: New York

We are so excited to announce our first-ever cohort traveling to New York City for our Summer 2017 program! Click here to learn more about this awesome city, and be sure to check back daily for a new city announcement. 

 

NEW YORK SUMMER 2017 COHORT
 

Tyler Bryant, University of Michigan

Tracy Chen, Amherst College

Annalise Ko, Scripps College

Anindya Mehta, University of Southern California

Lucian Ramnarase, University of Michigan

Kunal Singh, University of Michigan

Muhammad Tahir, McGill University

Anthony Zhou, University of Michigan

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City Spotlight: New York

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This blog post was written by David Meyer, one of our summer marketing interns.

What to Know

New York City is one of the United States’ biggest attractions. As one of the thirteen original colonies, New York has a long and storied history. New York City is also the city thought of most often when people talk about the US. In fact, if you Google “US cities”, it is the first one to come up. It is known for the bright lights of Times Square, the spectacular melting pot of cultures, and landmarks such as the Statue of Liberty. People also think of New York as a hub of business success, especially when thinking of Wall Street in the financial sector. But there is much more to New York and many more types of business opportunities that it has to offer.

What to Do

Sage Corps places value on cultural immersion and trying new things. New York is a perfect place for Sage Corps fellows to experience this. New York City is very unique. The city is an unbelievable place to explore, and it offers new experiences with every block. From the world-renowned Metropolitan Museum of Art to beautiful Central Park, New York City is filled with things to do. Art is abundant. Broadway shows are at every street corner. Also, the restaurants are fantastic, as NYC was number four on Zagat’s Top 17 Food Cities of 2015. In addition, while the city itself is the main attraction of New York, there is even more to the state than the Big Apple. New York offers beautiful natural attractions such as the Finger Lakes and Niagara Falls as well. The Museum Mile Festival, Central Park SummerStage, and the U.S. Open are all fun events in NYC.

Startup Scene

The newest business stronghold in New York is the startup community. According to the 2017 Global Startup Ecosystem Report, “New York City is the second largest ecosystem in the world by number of startups” and it “also produced the 3rd highest Number of Unicorns”. “Unicorns” are startups valued at over one billion dollars. Some New York-based unicorns listed by Built in NYC include Buzzfeed, Etsy, and FanDuel. Only two other cities have more startups become industry powerhouses. With a thriving startup ecosystem and plenty of success stories already, New York is a perfect location for us to send Sage Corps fellows.

We have found a myriad of New York startups that are perfect for us and our mission. We are sending Sage Corps fellows to a variety of different startups in the area. These startups are diverse, ranging from Basepair, a genetic data processor, to Tweed Wolf, a photo album creator. The variety in topics and the massive amount of startups in New York provide limitless opportunities for our fellows to spread their wings. Our network there continues to grow and more startups are signing up daily to work with us. We are beyond excited to send our first-ever cohort to this awesome city, and can't wait to send more students in future years!

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Summer 2017 Cohort Announcement: Paris

We are so excited to announce our cohorts for our Summer 2017 program!
Be sure to check back daily for a new city announcement. 

 

PARIS SUMMER 2017 COHORT
 

Arsh Arora, University of Pennsylvania

Gregory Del Vecho, Macalester College

Orvill Delatorre, Cornell University

Hayley Dent, University of Michigan

Qinyi Gu, University of Pennsylvania

Cher Huang, University of California Irvine

Nicholas Hunt, Boston University

Camila Kaplunov, Mount Holyoke College

Francisco Rocha, Colgate University

Thelma Sabi, University of Maryland College Park

Sandra Soueid, University of California San Diego

Tighe Sullivan, Colgate University

Becca Xu, Vanderbilt University

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